Optimistic Vegan


Famous vegetarians
March 13, 2010, 7:09 pm
Filed under: Celebrities | Tags:

Brad Pitt

Brooke Shields

Carrie Underwood

Carrie Anne Moss-vegan

Charles Darwin

Charlotte Bronte

Christian Bale

Christina Applegate

Doris Day

Elijah Wood-vegan

Ellen Degeneres-vegan

Emily Dickenson

Ghandi

George Bernard Shaw

H.G. Wells

Harriet Beecher Stowe

Hayden Panettiere

Henry David Thoreau

Jack Johnson

Jamie Lee Curtis

Jane Goodall

Jason Mraz-vegan

JD Salinger

Joaquin Phoenix-vegan

John Lennon

Kate Winslet

Kelly Clarkson

Kristen Bell

Leonardo Di Vinci-vegan

Leona Lewis

Liv Tyler-vegan

Mark Twain

Mary Shelley

Melissa Etheridge

Michael Franti-vegan

Michael Jackson

Natalie Merchant

Natalie Portman

Nelly

Olivia Newton John

Orlando Bloom

Paul McCartney

Pierce Brosnan

Pink

Pythagoras

Rosa Parks

Samuel L. Jackson

Seal

Sir Issac Newton

Socrates

Tobey Maguire-vegan

Vincent van Gogh

Weird Al Yankovic-vegan

Zooey Deschanel-vegan



Farm Sanctuary

For a couple years I’ve been listening to a vegan podcast called Food for Thought, done by Colleen Patrick-Goudreau. (I’ll have a separate blog post all her) She talks all the time about Farm Sanctuary, one of which is located close to her home in California. After hearing her talk about it and coming up all over the place, I found a book at the library written by the founder, Gene Baur.

Gene Baur. He’s a fantastic man who built Farm Sanctuary from scratch, beginning in a small backyard growing to a 175 acre site in New York and a 300 acre site in California. Farm Sanctuary was built so that rescued farm animals would have a safe place to live after experiencing the factory farming life. The animals that are there arrive for different reasons; they’ve escaped, they were presumed dead and thrown away, they were rescued from horrible conditions or they just needed a place to live.

Farm Sanctuary is a wonderful organization that supplements the actual, concrete care of animals, with passing legislation to protect others and investigating factory farms and slaughterhouses to gain the evidence they need to make change.

The book I checked out is called Farm Sanctuary and was written in 2008. Not only is it educational about each type of animal abuse in slaughterhouses and the process they go through, but there’s also little biographies at the end of each chapter about a specific animal on the farm. These little biographies are my favorite part—they’re what reminds the reader why Farm Sanctuary exists, the little bit of hope for a brighter future for all animals. A big thing that Farm Sanctuary emphasizes is that each animal is an individual that has a mind of it’s own—not just another part of the factory farm business.

This spring break I have the opportunity to visit Farm Sanctuary, and I’m so excited. For those of you who don’t know, it’s my dream to purchase a farm and create my own animal sanctuary. These unique animals are what I’m striving to save.

Sorry it’s been a while since I’ve posted!